Breathe Good, Feel Good!

Breathe Good Feel Good by Joshua Wieczorek

The respiratory system, if not the most necessary, is the most necessary and influential system in the human body. Because of inspiration, air travels down the trachea (windpipe) into our bronchial tubes. From the bronchial tubes, the inhaled air makes its way to the alveoli (destination air sacks in the lungs) where the O2 (oxygen) is then absorbed into the blood stream by the capillaries in the wall of the alveoli; the oxygen is then distributed throughout the body. In the long run, this system provides our cells with oxygen so our cells can perform cellular respiration and the mitochondria can continue to generate ATP for cellular reaction. An impaired respiratory system can result in a lack of oxygen in the body, and a lack of oxygen is completely detrimental to the human body. A lack of oxygen can cause Hypoxia and Hypoxemia which can be recognized by skin-color change, mental disarray, increased heart rate, shortness of breath, coughing, and sweating (WebMD, n.d.).

Keeping enough oxygen in our system and our lungs healthy are mandatory for our bodies to function correctly. Utilizing the ALA’s website I realized how detrimental smoking is to the lungs. Smoking damages the lungs natural ability to cleanse the air as it is traverses to its destination points. Also smoking damages the lungs ability to repair itself, making itself vulnerable to diseases and cancer. Breathe good clean air, and feel good all around. Breathe good, feel good.

Below are a couple of helpful and interesting websites to checkout!

http://www.lung.org/your-lungs/how-lungs-work/

http://www.webmd.com/lung/how-we-breathe

http://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/hypoxia-hypoxemia

http://www.lung.org/about-us/our-impact/top-stories/lungs-101-how-does-smoking.html

https://www.biodigital.com/

Works Cited

WebMD. (n.d.). Hypoxia and Hypoxemia: Symptoms, Treatment, Causes. Retrieved April 15, 2015, from http://www.webmd.com/asthma/guide/hypoxia-hypoxemia

Originally written Wednesday, April 15, 2015 for Keiser University’s Advanced Biology Course.

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